Past Pizza Lunches

Number of entries: 155

03
March 2017

Telescope Control Unit design for ARIEL mission


Start: 00:00h
Speaker: Carles Sierra Roig (Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo (ICE building, Campus UAB)

The Atmospheric Remote-sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large Survey (ARIEL) is one the three candidates for the next ESA medium class (M4) mission expected to be launched in 2026. This mission will be devoted to observing spectroscopically in the infrared a large population (500-1000) of known transiting…
Start: 00:00h
Speaker: Carles Sierra Roig (Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo (ICE building, Campus UAB)

The Atmospheric Remote-sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large Survey (ARIEL) is one the three candidates for the next ESA medium class (M4) mission expected to be launched in 2026. This mission will be devoted to observing spectroscopically in the infrared a large population (500-1000) of known transiting planets in our Galaxy, opening a new discovery space in the field of extra-solar planets and enabling the understanding of the physics and chemistry of these far away worlds. IEEC-CSIC (PI: Ignasi Ribas) is leading the Telescope Control Unit (TCU), a mission critical element of the Warm Front-End Electronics. In this talk I will present the work done in the TCU for the Phase A of ARIEL mission with a small mention of a prototype developed for my Final Degree Thesis based on TCU's architecture (advisors: Jose-Maria Gómez @IEEC-UB & Lluís Gesa @IEEC-CSIC). I will conclude the presentation with a summary of the last paper from Eagleworks Laboratories regarding the state of the art of the EM Drive, as I am planing to study it for the Final Master Thesis. 
24
February 2017

ICE 's Radiation Laboratory


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: José-Luis Gálvez Sánchez (Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo (ICE building, Campus UAB)

As you probably know our institute run different laboratories which support and enhance the technology behind our scientific projects. It is mandatory that our laboratories are in good shape so that an excellent science can be achieved. One of these laboratories is the radiation laboratory (RadLab)…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: José-Luis Gálvez Sánchez (Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo (ICE building, Campus UAB)

As you probably know our institute run different laboratories which support and enhance the technology behind our scientific projects. It is mandatory that our laboratories are in good shape so that an excellent science can be achieved. One of these laboratories is the radiation laboratory (RadLab) which is a radioactive facility authorized by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN). This talk introduces what a Radiation Laboratory means and describes the main activities undergone in the lab with radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and high energy astrophysics.
17
February 2017

LISA Pathfinder: one year in free-fall


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Miquel Nofrarias Serra (Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo (ICE building, Campus UAB)

After several years of intense technological research, during 2016 we’ve seen the start of Gravitational Wave Astronomy. On Feb. 11th 2016 Advanced LIGO announced the first detection of a gravitational wave signal from a black hole binary merge. Coincidentally, just a few days after (Feb.…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Miquel Nofrarias Serra (Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo (ICE building, Campus UAB)

After several years of intense technological research, during 2016 we’ve seen the start of Gravitational Wave Astronomy. On Feb. 11th 2016 Advanced LIGO announced the first detection of a gravitational wave signal from a black hole binary merge. Coincidentally, just a few days after (Feb. 15th) LISA Pathfinder released for the first time one of its test masses and started operating in free fall, with the main objective of testing the required technology to build a future space-based observatory. LISA Pathfinder lifted off from French Guaiana in December 3rd 2015. After a cruise phase, it reached the Lagrange point 1 where it started, first, the commissioning phase and then the scientific operations. In this talk I will review this last year of operations, describing the daily operations scenario and the mission main scientific results so far.
10
February 2017

Periodic signals from very (ultra) luminous X-ray sources


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Dr. Paolo Esposito (University of Amsterdam)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo

In the last few years, we have undertaken systematic searches for periodic signals from X-ray sources in the Swift, Chandra, and XMM-Newton archives. So far, the effort has yielded about one hundred new X-ray pulsators. I will give a brief overview of the projects and then concentrate on the results…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Dr. Paolo Esposito (University of Amsterdam)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo

In the last few years, we have undertaken systematic searches for periodic signals from X-ray sources in the Swift, Chandra, and XMM-Newton archives. So far, the effort has yielded about one hundred new X-ray pulsators. I will give a brief overview of the projects and then concentrate on the results about two small, but rapidly growing, groups: the Wolf-Rayet/black hole binaries and the ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) containing neutron stars. I will discuss some implications of these systems in the ULX context and for the prospects of gravitational wave interferometers.
03
February 2017

Timing analysis of the Low Mass X-ray Binary system 4U 1323-619


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Angelo F. Gambino (Università degli Studi di Palermo)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo

Low Mass X-ray Binary systems (LMXBs) are old binary systems that are made up of a compact object (a neutron star or a black hole) and a companion star having a mass lower than one Solar mass. These systems are visible in the X-ray band owing to the transfer of mass from the companion star to the compact…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Angelo F. Gambino (Università degli Studi di Palermo)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo

Low Mass X-ray Binary systems (LMXBs) are old binary systems that are made up of a compact object (a neutron star or a black hole) and a companion star having a mass lower than one Solar mass. These systems are visible in the X-ray band owing to the transfer of mass from the companion star to the compact object. LMXBs that show periodical features in their light curves are considerably important in order to directly infer the orbital parameters of these systems. According to this, we studied the the source 4U 1323-619 that hosts a neutron star and that shows periodical dips in its light curve. Taking the advantage of about 26 years of X-ray data, we updated the existing ephemeris, further constraining the orbital period of the system of one order of magnitude with respect to the previous estimation, and obtaining a constraint on the orbital period derivative for the first time. We estimate the mass of the companion star and constrain the distance to the source at 4.2 kpc, using a 3D extinction map of the Ks radiation in our Galaxy. We will show that this distance is consistent with a luminosity of the source that is in agreement with the luminosity predicted by the theory of secular evolution for binary systems, in the case in which the mass of the companion star is totally transferred to the neutron star via the inner Lagrangian point.
27
January 2017

How I run into a black hole but found a way out


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Diego Rubiera-Garcia (Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences (IA))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo, ICE

Black holes are the end-point of gravitational collapse of fuel-exhausted stars beyond a certain mass, and are well described in the context of General Relativity (GR) by three parameters: mass, charge and angular momentum. However, GR also predicts the unavoidable existence of space-time singularities…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Diego Rubiera-Garcia (Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences (IA))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo, ICE

Black holes are the end-point of gravitational collapse of fuel-exhausted stars beyond a certain mass, and are well described in the context of General Relativity (GR) by three parameters: mass, charge and angular momentum. However, GR also predicts the unavoidable existence of space-time singularities deep inside black holes, which poses a major threat to predictability and determinism of our physical theories. These two aspects (existence of black holes and space-time singularities) seem to come together within GR without possibility of disentanglement. This way, extensions of GR have been proposed in the literature to avoid such a situation. In this talk I will explain how the singularity problem can be resolved within one of such extensions, which is borrowed from an analogy with defected crystalline structures in solid state physics. I will further show how physical observers could fall into such a black hole but run away unscathed.
20
January 2017

Kinetic inhibition of shock formation in the presence of a parallel magnetic field


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Antoine Bret (Universidad Castilla La Manch)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo

According to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), the encounter of two collisional magnetized gas shells at high velocity gives rise to shock waves. Investigations conducted so far have found that the same conclusion still holds for collisionless plasmas. Even if thermalization cannot be achieved through binary…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Antoine Bret (Universidad Castilla La Manch)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo

According to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), the encounter of two collisional magnetized gas shells at high velocity gives rise to shock waves. Investigations conducted so far have found that the same conclusion still holds for collisionless plasmas. Even if thermalization cannot be achieved through binary collisions, collective plasma interactions are able to do so, ensuring MHD applies. We present a violation of the MHD predictions when we consider the encounter of two cold pair plasmas along a flow-aligned magnetic field. For a strong enough guiding magnetic field, thermalization is suppressed, inhibiting the formation of a shock. A micro-physics analysis allows us to understand the mechanisms at work. Particle-in-cell simulations also support our conclusions and show that the results are not restricted to a strictly parallel field.
13
January 2017

Proxima b : small planets around red dwarfs and the search for life beyond the Solar system


Start: 12:30h
Speaker: Dr. Guillem Anglada Escudé (Queen Mary University of London)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo, ICE

The existence of Proxima b -a possibly terrestrial planet in the habitable zone of the nearest star to the Sun- is a lucky concidence but not an event of cosmic fortune. Red dwarf stars that cannot be seen via naked eye are the most common stars in the Galaxy (about 70% of them) and detecting small,…
Start: 12:30h
Speaker: Dr. Guillem Anglada Escudé (Queen Mary University of London)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo, ICE

The existence of Proxima b -a possibly terrestrial planet in the habitable zone of the nearest star to the Sun- is a lucky concidence but not an event of cosmic fortune. Red dwarf stars that cannot be seen via naked eye are the most common stars in the Galaxy (about 70% of them) and detecting small, rocky, temperate and potentially habitable planets is way easier than around more massive stars like our Sun. I will put the discovery of Proxima b in the context of exoplanet detection and what we know in terms of the galactic abundance of planets around these stars. I will review the state of the art of the Doppler method in more detail, which is one of the two techniques leading to the discovery of the nearest red Earths. The smallness of the star also means that the planet-star contrast is better for potential follow-up studies such as atmospheric characterization and future attempts of direct imaging it. Looking into the future, the existence of terrestrial planets so close to our Sun has renewed the interest on advanced concepts to obtain direct images of them, and even sending interstellar probes within the next century. 
16
December 2016

Our Universe had (probably) an origin: Big Bang, cosmic singularities and quantum fluctuations


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Emilio Elizalde
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo

I will briefly recall well-known evidence about the fact that, most probably, our Universe had an origin. I will devote some time to clarify the concept of Big Bang, namely: (i) what did it mean to the person who came up with the concept and disgustedly pronounced these two words for the very first time;…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Emilio Elizalde
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo

I will briefly recall well-known evidence about the fact that, most probably, our Universe had an origin. I will devote some time to clarify the concept of Big Bang, namely: (i) what did it mean to the person who came up with the concept and disgustedly pronounced these two words for the very first time; (ii) what does it mean to the most rigorous mathematical cosmologists, e.g., the Big Bang singularity, and if such is still maintained when quantum physics is accounted for; and (iii) what this same term means in the present context of the so-called Big Bang cosmological model. A theorem of Borde, Guth and Vilenkin, which takes into account inflation and quantum vacuum fluctuations, and which extends former results of singularity theorems by Penrose, Geroch and Hawking, and a previous theorem of Borde and Vilenkin, seems to provide the last word, up to present, on the main issue here. But the final conclusion is still dependent on the theory itself being considered in order to describe, by looking backwards, the very first stage of our expanding cosmos. Finally, time permitting, related work of our group, which we have recently published, will be discussed.  
02
December 2016

ALMA: a new era for (sub)millimeter aperture synthesis astronomy


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Josep Miquel Girart Medina (Institute of Space Sciences (ICE))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo, ICE

In this talk I will show work in progress regarding the observational campaign carried with ALMA in the last year. ALMA provides an improvement of the angular resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range (image fidelity) of more than an order of magnitude with respect to its predecessors (CARMA,…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Josep Miquel Girart Medina (Institute of Space Sciences (ICE))
Place: Sala Alberto Lobo, ICE

In this talk I will show work in progress regarding the observational campaign carried with ALMA in the last year. ALMA provides an improvement of the angular resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range (image fidelity) of more than an order of magnitude with respect to its predecessors (CARMA, SMA, PdB). So, we should expect a major step forward in the understanding of star and planet formation, do we?
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An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas
Affiliated with the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya

Affiliated with the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya