All future seminars

Number of entries: 2

17
November 2017

Finding the double sunsets: close binary stars and large spectroscopic surveys


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Carles Badenes ((University of Pittsburgh/ICCUB))
Place: Alberto Lobo Conference Room S1-01

I will discuss our present knowledge of the statistics of stellar multiplicity (the multiplicity fraction and the distribution of periods, mass ratios, and eccentricities), and the implications for stellar evolution, in particular for Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia). I will describe how multi-epoch radial…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Carles Badenes ((University of Pittsburgh/ICCUB))
Place: Alberto Lobo Conference Room S1-01

I will discuss our present knowledge of the statistics of stellar multiplicity (the multiplicity fraction and the distribution of periods, mass ratios, and eccentricities), and the implications for stellar evolution, in particular for Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia). I will describe how multi-epoch radial velocity measurements from large spectroscopic surveys can open a new observational window on stellar multiplicity, and present two case studies: white dwarfs in SDSS/SEGUE, and red giants in SDSS/APOGEE. For the white dwarfs, we can measure their merger rate and evaluate their viability as Type Ia SN progenitors. For the red giants, we can explore the interplay between stellar evolution and stellar multiplicity, evaluate the rate of stellar mergers, and uncover a strong dependence of the multiplicity fraction with metallicity.
21
December 2017

Let there be light -- faint galaxies and their pathways of formation


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Anna Ferré-Mateu (Swinburne University of Technology)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobos

Only once in a generation is there the opportunity to reveal the basic properties of a new galaxy type for the first time. With the advent of more sensitive instruments in the current large telescopes, an entirely new universe is being revealed, as it had never been seen before. And it is a challenging…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Anna Ferré-Mateu (Swinburne University of Technology)
Place: Sala Alberto Lobos


Only once in a generation is there the opportunity to reveal the basic properties of a new galaxy type for the first time. With the advent of more sensitive instruments in the current large telescopes, an entirely new universe is being revealed, as it had never been seen before. And it is a challenging one, a low-luminosity universe that is populated by a myriad of new galaxies that are classified into new fancy families: the ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs), the compact ellipticals (cEs) and the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs). 
Despite some attempts to characterize and understand such galaxies, a recurrent topic prevails: what are they really? Are they intrinsic objects, i.e. were they formed as we see them now?; or were they initially other types of galaxies that have later evolved due to external interactions, which shaped them into what we see now? In the case of cEs, we have been lucky enough to catch some of them 'in the act', being stripped by a larger galaxy. However, at the same time, some of them have been found to be completely isolated and with no signs of interaction. In this talk I will discuss the different pathways for cE formation and the expectations from their super massive black holes. I will also show how a similarly detailed study for all the faint families together can provide crucial clues for the galaxy evolution paradigm.
Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC)

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An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas
Affiliated with the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya

Affiliated with the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya