News & Press releases

Number of entries: 108

31
October 2017

***EMBARGAT*** Josep Maria Trigo miembro de la Selección Española de Ciencia 2017


Josep Maria Trigo ha sido seleccionado como miembro de la Selección Española de Ciencia 2017 por la revista QUO
La revista de divulgación QUO, con la colaboración del CSIC y la secretaría de Estado de Innovación a seleccionado a nueve investigadores españoles como miembros de la Selección Española de Ciencia para 2017. Esta selección científica está formada por: Lluís Torner, Concha Monje, Ramón López de Mántaras, María Carmen Collado, Javier Tamayo, Antonio Figueras, Alejandro Ocampo y los astrofísicos Guillem Anglada-Escudé y Josep Maria Trigo, miembro este último del Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio. La entrega de los galardones se realizará a principios de octubre en la sede central del CSIC en Madrid.
13
July 2017

Molecular outflow launched beyond the disk around a young star


For the first time, astronomers has observed a molecular outflow being launched from beyond the disk surrounding a young stellar object.
For the first time, an international team of astronomers, including J.M. Girart from the Institute of Space Science (IEEC-CSIC), has observed a molecular outflow being launched from beyond the disk surrounding a young stellar object. Outflows carry away excess angular momentum and it has been proposed that these disk winds should be launched from a wide region in the protoplanetary disk. The recent observations now show that the outflows are asymmetric and that they are launched beyond the edge of the disk, at the position of the landing site of the in-falling material.


A long-standing problem of star formation is how to get rid of the excess of angular momentum from in-falling material in the molecular cloud where a young star is born. In the classical picture, angular momentum is removed both by a stellar wind close to the newly formed star and by a disk wind from a wide region in the protoplanetary disk around the star. The exact location from where such disk winds are launched, however, is not well known.

An international team of astronomers, led by the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), now used the ALMA radio telescope to investigate the young stellar object BHB07-11, a precursor of Solar-type stars. “Our continuum data reveal an unprecedented view of the dust distribution in the YSO,” points out Felipe O. Alves from MPE, the lead author of the paper describing the study. “We achieved an enhanced brightness contrast between the circumstellar disk and the surrounding tenuous material - even showing spiral structures.” 

Even more impressive, however, are the observations of the molecular tracers: They show a bipolar outflow launched at symmetric positions with respect to the disk at quite a large distance from the centre. This is the first time that outflow material is seen ejected not from the disk but beyond its edge.  The large offset of the launching position coincides with the landing site of the infall material from the surrounding parent cloud. At the landing site, models predict that magnetic field lines are strongly pinched due to the dragging of the in-falling gas from the inner envelope. The resulting enhanced magnetic field leads to outflows that are efficiently ejected by a magneto-centrifugal mechanism within a narrow region outside the disk edge.

These results have been published in the Letters of the Astronomy and Astrophysics by F. O. Alves, J. M. Girart, P. Caselli, et al. For more information go the original press release at the Max Institute of Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany)
28
June 2017

The Institute of Space Sciences is leading a recently approved ESF-COST Action on Neutron Stars


PHAROS: a new ESF-COST Action funded for fours years to study Neutron Stars, lead by Nanda Rea of the Institute of Space Sciences
The European Science Fundation has funded for four years "PHAROS", a COST Action aimed at studying Neutron Stars via a multi-disciplinary approach, spanning Astrophysics, Gravitational and Nuclear Physics. This COST Action, lead by Nanda Rea (ICE, IEEC-CSIC), comprised 109 proposers from 30 different countries, with the participation of several ICE members (L. Tolos, C. Manuel, D.F. Torres, E. De-Oña Wilhelmi, C. Sopuerta, M. Hernanz, among others). PHAROS has the ambitious goal of tackling key challenges in the physics involved in neutron stars by facing them via an innovative, problem based approach, that hinges on focused, interdisciplinary working groups. Each group will have all the diversified expertise needed to tackle different open aspects of the physics of neutron stars, and will provide to the different communities several tools and deliverables prepared in a shared language, and of easy access for scientists coming from different physics, ranging, for example, from nuclear physics to radio astronomy. Furthermore, key priority of this action is promoting via training, mobility, equal opportunity and outreach activities, enthusiastic students and young researchers from all over Europe, that will grow and spread the Action’s innovative multi-disciplinary approach. Collaboration is an indispensable feature of high-quality and innovative research, and the deeper we dive into specific exciting and complex fields, the more the need of brainpower and resources from complementary kinds of expertise is of crucial importance. This will build on the multi-disciplinary network that PHAROS will create.
20
June 2017

EUMETSAT ROM SAF CDOP-3 meeting num. 20 of the Project Team at the ICE


June 19th and 20th, the Project Team of EUMETSAT ROM SAF CDOP-3 meet in the ICE
On June 19th and 20th it is held the 20th meeting of the EUMETSAT Radio Occultation Meteorology Satellite Application Facility (ROM SAF) CDOP-3 Project Team at the Institute of Space Sciences.
14
June 2017

Chaotically Magnetized Cloud Is No Place to Build a Star, or Is It?


ALMA has revealed a surprisingly weak and wildly disorganized magnetic field very near a newly emerging protostar
A team of astronomers, including Josep Miquel Girart (ICE, IEEC-CSIC), has discovered a surprisingly weak and wildly disorganized magnetic field very near a newly emerging protostar. These observations suggest that the impact of a magnetic field on star formation is more complex than previously thought.

The researchers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope to map the magnetic field surrounding the young protostar dubbed Ser-emb 8, which resides about 1,420 light-years away in the Serpens star-forming region. These new observations are the most sensitive ever made of the small-scale magnetic fields surrounding a young protostar. They also provide important insights into the formation of low-mass stars like our own sun.

This research was presented in a paper titled “Unveiling the Role of the Magnetic Field at the Smallest Scales of Star Formation”, by C. Hull et al., appearing in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 842, L9.

For more information go to the ALMA news page.
14
June 2017

CTA Prototype Telescope, ASTRI,Achieves First Light


First light of ASTRI, a proposed Small-Sized Telescope design for CTA
During the nights of 25 and 26 May, the camera of the ASTRI telescope prototype (pictured to the left) recorded its first ever Cherenkov light while undergoing testing at the astronomical site of Serra La Nave (Mount Etna) in Sicily managed by INAF-Catania. This comes not long after its optical validation was achieved in November 2016. This accomplishment was the first optical demonstration for astronomical telescopes using the novel Schwarzschild Couder dual-mirror design. The ASTRI telescope is a proposed Small-Sized Telescope design for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA).

Although the camera was not fully configured, the ASTRI team was still able to capture its first Cherenkov light and produce beautiful images of the showers generated by cosmic rays in the Earth’s atmosphere. The camera was specifically designed to fit on the dual mirror ASTRI telescopes for covering a large field of view of 10 x 10 degrees.

Three classes of telescope types are required to cover the full CTA very-high energy range (20 GeV to 300 TeV): Medium-Sized Telescopes (12 m diameter dish) will cover CTA’s core energy range (100 GeV to 10 TeV) while the Large-Sized Telescopes (23 m) and Small-Sized Telescopes (4 m) or SSTs are planned to extend the energy range below 100 GeV and above a few TeV, respectively. The ASTRI telescope is one of three proposed SST designs being prototyped and tested for CTA’s southern hemisphere array. It uses an innovative dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder configuration with a 4.3 m diameter primary mirror and a 1.8 m monolithic secondary mirror.
 
08
June 2017

The review by ICREA Professor S.D. Odintsov is accepted in Physics Reports.


The review by ICREA Professor S.D. Odintsov is accepted in Physics Reports.
The review paper by S.Nojiri, S.D. Odintsov and V. Oikonomou, Modified Gravity Theories on a Nutshell: Inflation, Bounce and Late-time Evolution, arXiv:1705.11098 is accepted for publication in Physics Reports. With Impact Factor over 16, this is one of the leading journals in Physics and Astronomy.
07
June 2017

Scientists of the Euclid Consortium announce the release of the largest simulated galaxy catalogue ever built


Scientists of the Euclid Consortium announce the release of the largest simulated galaxy catalogue ever built
Euclid is a space mission of the European Space Agency (sci.esa.int/euclid) that will map the geometry of the dark Universe and the cosmic history of structure formation in the Universe by taking images and spectra of thousands of millions of galaxies.

The mission, to be launched in 2020, will provide a wealth of unprecedented high quality data collected with two different instruments: an imager at visible wavelenths (VIS) and an spectro-photometer in the near infrared (NISP) . VIS and NISP are built by the Euclid Consortium ( http://www.euclid-ec.org/  ), an organisation that brings together international teams of astronomers and physicists in charge of the production of the data and the scientific exploitation of the Euclid mission. The combination of these two powerful instruments will provide a unique window to the early stages of evolution of the universe. In particular, it will shed light on the nature of the mysterious dark-energy that drives the observed accelerated expansion of the universe, and test Einstein's general relativity theory on the largest cosmological scales.

Mining this big and complex cosmological dataset is a formidable challenging task involving ESA and hundreds of scientists of the Euclid Consortium from 14 European countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Switzerland and United Kingdom), the United States and Canada. A key ingredient in order to prepare the scientific exploitation of this "golden" dataset is the development of synthetic observations of the real survey: a cosmological simulation that matches the expected volume and complexity of the real data. In a massive coordinated effort, a team of scientists of the Euclid project have worked together over the last year to develop the largest simulated galaxy catalogue ever produced, the so-called "Euclid Flagship" mock galaxy catalogue.

The Euclid Flagship mock galaxy catalogue is based on the record-setting 2 trillion (2 followed by 12 zeros) dark-matter particle simulation performed on the supercomputer Piz Daint, hosted by the Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS). The simulation code was developed by a team of scientists at the University of Zurich, led by Joachim Stadel from the Institute for Computational Science. This unique dataset reproduces with exquisite precision the emergence of the large scale structure of the Universe, with hundred of billions of dark matter halos hosting the galaxies we see in the night sky today.

Using this dark-matter cosmic web from the Flagship simulation, a group of scientists of the Euclid Consortium at Institut de Ciències de L'Espai (ICE, IEEC-CSIC) and Port d’Informació Científica (PIC) in Barcelona, in collaboration with the Cosmological Simulations Working Group, led by Pablo Fosalba (ICE, IEEC-CSIC) and Romain Teyssier (Institute for Computational Science at the University of Zurich), have built a synthetic galaxy catalogue using state-of-the-art scientific pipelines that implement the Halo Occupation Distribution technique, a sophisticated recipe to relate dark and luminous matter in the universe.

The Euclid Flagship mock galaxy catalogue contains more than 2 thousand million galaxies distributed over the 3-dimension cosmological volume that Euclid will survey. Synthetic galaxies in this simulation mimic with great detail the complex properties that real sources display: ranging from their shapes, colours, luminosities, and emission lines in their spectra, to the gravitational lensing distortions that affect the light emitted by distant galaxies as it travels to us, the observers.  A dedicated web portal, CosmoHub (cosmohub.pic.es) hosted by PIC, the Euclid Spanish Science Data Center, will distribute the Flagship mock data to the 1000+ members of the Euclid Consortium.

Armed with this new virtual universe, scientists will be able to assess the performance of the Euclid mission as a whole, the so-called Science Performance Verification. The Science Performance Verification exercise uses a full end to end simulation of the Euclid mission developed by ESA and the Euclid Consortium and represents a critical milestone of the project.  Moreover the Euclid Flagship mock will be an essential tool to develop the data processing and the science analysis pipelines developed by the Euclid Science ground Segment and the Science Working Groups and will set the science for the exciting discoveries that await the Euclid mission when the real data shall come.

Image 1: Euclid Flagship mock galaxy catalogue (TIFF: 97 MB)

Caption image 1: Euclid Flagship mock galaxy catalogue

False colour images showing a small portion (0.3%) of the full light-cone simulation of mock galaxies in the Euclid survey.

Light-cone stripes extend 500 Mpc/h (vertical) x 3800 Mpc/h (horizontal axis). The 2-dimension "pencil beam" images result from a slice of the 3-dimension light-cone, projected from a 40 Mpc/h width (in the direction orthogonal to the image plane).

From top to bottom, panels display the full sample of galaxies in the mock, and the sub-samples expected from observations in the VIS and NISP-Halpha channels.

The galaxy mock has been produced using a Halo Occupation Distribution pipeline developed by the Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (ICE) and Port d'Informació Científica (PIC) in Barcelona, and it is based on the 2 trillion dark-matter particle Flagship run produced by U.Zurich.

Image 2: Galaxy types in the Flagship mock (TIFF: 208 MB)

Caption image 2: Galaxy types in the Flagship mock

Top panel: False colour images showing a small portion (0.3%) of the full light-cone simulation (similar to Image 1), but showing different galaxy types with different colours. Central galaxies are coloured in green, and satellites in red.

Bottom panel: zoom in of the top panel image that displays the local universe with greater detail. Central galaxies populate all dark-matter halos of the cosmic web, whereas satellite galaxies tend to reside in the most massive halos, that is, in the highest density peaks of the underlying dark-matter distribution.

Credit: J. Carretero/P. Tallada/S. Serrano for ICE/PIC/U.Zurich and the Euclid Consortium Cosmological Simulations SWG

For further information please contact:

Francisco Castander
ICE, IEEC-CSIC
Galaxy Mock Production Work Package Lead
Email: fjc@ieec.uab.es

Pablo Fosalba
ICE, IEEC-CSIC
Cosmological Simulations SWG Lead
Email: fosalba@ieec.uab.es

Yannick Mellier
IAP, CEA/IRFU
Euclid Consortium Lead
Email: mellier@iap.fr

Joachim Stadel
UZH/ICS
Large N-Body Simulations Work Package Lead
Email:  stadel@physik.uzh.ch

Romain Teyssier
UZH/ICS
Cosmological Simulations SWG Lead
Email: romain.teyssier@uzh.ch
29
May 2017

La compleja vuelta atrás


Interview to Nanda Rea published in: El Periodico
Los recortes han reducido al mínimo los mecanismos de atracción de talento, pero los investigadores migrantes siguen encontrando atractivo hacer ciencia en España. Una investigadora asturiana «fugada» al Reino Unido, una gallega que ha vuelto a España y una italiana afincada en Barcelona reflexionan sobre los incentivos para investigar en España. http://www.elperiodico.com/es/noticias/ciencia/compleja-vuelta-atras-6064934  
07
May 2017

Charla de Kip Thorne el 26 Mayo a 18:00 en el Auditorio de La Pedrera


Charla de Kip Thorne el 26 Mayo a 18:00 en el Auditorio de La Pedrera
La Fundació Catalunya-La Pedrera y el Instituto de Ciencias Fotónicas (ICFO), en colaboración con el Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos de la Universidad de Barcelona (ICCUB), el Instituto de Física de Altas Energías (IFAE), el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE-CSIC) y el Instituto de Estudios Espaciales de Cataluña (IEEC) os presentan la conferencia de   Dr. Kip Thorne   Feynman Professor de física teórica, emérito, en el marco de la Cátedra Ignacio Cirac - Fundació Catalunya-La Pedrera de ICFO el dia 26 de mayo a las 18:00 en el auditorio de La Pedrera.   Las ondas gravitacionales son ondulaciones en el tejido del espacio y el tiempo que fueron predichas por Albert Einstein hace 100 años. Después de medio siglo de esfuerzo, los seres humanos hemos tenido nuestro primer contacto con estas ondas. LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) ha detectado y descifrado las ondas producidas por dos agujeros negros colisionando a mil millones de años luz de la Tierra.   La conferencia tendrá el título "Exploring the Universe with Gravitational Waves: From the Big Bang to Black Holes”.  El Dr. Thorne hablará del proyecto LIGO, el cual cofundó, y sus descubrimientos, así como del futuro de la astronomía de ondas gravitacionales.   La conferencia, de carácter divulgativo, va dirigida al público general interesado en la exploración científica de la Naturaleza.   El acto es gratuito. Os rogamos por favor que confirméis vuestra asistencia registrándoos en http://www.creacongresos.com/forms/DRTHORNETALK/. Debido al aforo limitado del auditorio, os animamos a registraros lo antes posible y os rogamos que nos aviséis en caso de no poder asistir para poder liberar vuestra plaza.  
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An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas
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