All future seminars

Number of entries: 3

22
January 2021

Dense Matter Equation of State


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Laura Tolos (ICE)
Place: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85044910172?pwd=bXRmeWx3cTdDSzkrMFFJUXI5eE9hQT09

The equation of state of dense matter is of crucial importance for the description of the static and dynamical properties of neutron stars. In this talk I will review the current status of the hadronic equation of state for neutron stars, from the point of both ab-initio many-body approaches and phenomenological…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Laura Tolos (ICE)
Place: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85044910172?pwd=bXRmeWx3cTdDSzkrMFFJUXI5eE9hQT09

The equation of state of dense matter is of crucial importance for the description of the static and dynamical properties of neutron stars. In this talk I will review the current status of the hadronic equation of state for neutron stars, from the point of both ab-initio many-body approaches and phenomenological models, paying a special attention to the role of strange hadrons, the so-called hyperons. The theoretical predictions for the hadronic equation of state will be then compared to the data coming from both nuclear physics experiments and astrophysical observations, providing insights for future investigations.
29
January 2021

Impact of nonlinear prescriptions and baryonic effects on future weak lensing analyses


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Isaac Tutusaus Lleixa (ICE-CSIC)
Place: Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85044910172?pwd=bXRmeWx3cTdDSzkrMFFJUXI5eE9hQT09 Meeting ID: 850 4491 0172 Passcode: 996691

Upcoming surveys will map the growth of large-scale structure with unprecedented precision, improving our understanding of the dark sector of the Universe. Unfortunately, much of the cosmological information is encoded by the small scales, where the clustering of dark matter and the effects of astrophysical…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Isaac Tutusaus Lleixa (ICE-CSIC)
Place: Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85044910172?pwd=bXRmeWx3cTdDSzkrMFFJUXI5eE9hQT09 Meeting ID: 850 4491 0172 Passcode: 996691

Upcoming surveys will map the growth of large-scale structure with unprecedented precision, improving our understanding of the dark sector of the Universe. Unfortunately, much of the cosmological information is encoded by the small scales, where the clustering of dark matter and the effects of astrophysical feedback processes are not fully understood. This can bias the estimates of cosmological parameters. In this talk I will present the recent results obtained within the Euclid Consortium for a joint analysis of Euclid cosmic shear and Planck cosmic microwave background data. I will show the change on constraining power and the biased parameter estimates when using different modelling of both the matter power spectrum and the baryonic feedback. I will then conclude by showing the importance of accurately modelling these effects to properly extract the information from future weak lensing surveys.
05
February 2021

X-raying the winds of massive stars using high mass X-ray binaries


Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Victoria Grinberg (IAAT, Universität Tübingen, Germany)
Place: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85044910172?pwd=bXRmeWx3cTdDSzkrMFFJUXI5eE9hQT09 Meeting ID: 850 4491 0172 Passcode: 996691

We are made of stardust—or, at least in significant parts, of material processed in stars. Hot, massive giant stars can drive the chemical evolution of galaxies and trigger and quench star formation through their strong winds and their final demise as supernovae. Yet optical and X-ray measurements…
Start: 12:00h
Speaker: Victoria Grinberg (IAAT, Universität Tübingen, Germany)
Place: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85044910172?pwd=bXRmeWx3cTdDSzkrMFFJUXI5eE9hQT09 Meeting ID: 850 4491 0172 Passcode: 996691

We are made of stardust—or, at least in significant parts, of material processed in stars. Hot, massive giant stars can drive the chemical evolution of galaxies and trigger and quench star formation through their strong winds and their final demise as supernovae. Yet optical and X-ray measurements of the wind mass loss strongly disagree and can only be reconciled if the winds are highly structured, with colder, dense clumps embedded in a tenuous hot gas. In (quasi-)single stars, however, wind properties are inferred for the whole wind ensemble only; no measurements of individual clumps or clump groups are possible, limiting our understanding of wind properties. Luckily, nature provides us with perfect laboratories to study clumpy winds: high mass X-ray binaries. The radiation from close to the compact object is quasi-point like and effectively X-rays the wind, in particular the clumps crossing our line of sight.

In this talk, I will show how we can use a variety of observations to constrain wind properties in some of the brightest HMXBs today. I will in particular focus on the advances from the recent years as done by the X-wind collaboration. Time- and absorption-resolved high resolution X-ray spectroscopy reveals the composition of the multicomponent wind plasma, the structure of the accretion wake, and the wind's response to changes in irradiation. New simulations of wind accretion pave the way towards constraining clump properties from stochastic variability of absorption. Future X-ray telescopes such as XRISM and Athena will revolutionise the field, allowing us to observe individual clumps in bright sources and, for the first time, make faint sources accessible for high resolution spectroscopy.
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An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas
Affiliated with the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya

Affiliated with the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya