News & Press releases

Número de entradas: 119

15
Enero 2021

ICE researchers collaborate in the Dark Energy Survey, a public catalog of nearly 700 million astronomical objects


DR2 is the second data release in the survey’s seven-year history
Elliptical galaxy NGC 474 with star shells.
DES/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA. Acknowledgments: Image processing: DES, Jen Miller (Gemini Observatory/NSF's NOIRLab), Travis Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), Mahdi Zamani & Davide de Martin. Image curation: Erin Sheldon, Brookhaven National Laboratory
Francisco J. Castander, Martin Crocce, Pablo Fosalba, Enrique Gaztañaga and Santiago Serrano participate in this international collaboration, that involves Fermilab, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, NOIRLab and others. The initiative releases a massive, public collection of astronomical data and calibrated images from six years of surveys. This data release is one of the largest astronomical catalogs issued to date.

The Dark Energy Survey, a global collaboration including the Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, and the National Science Foundation’s NOIRLab, has released DR2, the second data release in the survey’s seven-year history. DR2 is the topic of sessions today and tomorrow at the 237th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, which is being held virtually. 

ICE researchers Castander, Crocce, Fosalba, Gaztañaga and Serrano have been involved in the development of DR2 , the second release of images and object catalogs from the Dark Energy Survey, or DES: The catalog is the culmination of over a half-decade of astronomical data collection and analysis with the ultimate goal of understanding the accelerating expansion of the universe and the phenomenon of dark energy, which is thought to be responsible for this accelerated expansion. It is one of the largest astronomical catalogs released to date.

Including a catalog of nearly 700 million astronomical objects, DR2 builds on the 400 million objects cataloged with the survey’s prior data release, or DR1, and also improves on it by refining calibration techniques, which, with the deeper combined images of DR2, lead to improved estimates of the amount and distribution of matter in the universe.

Astronomical researchers around the world can access these unprecedented data and mine them to make new discoveries about the universe, complementary to the studies being carried out by the Dark Energy Survey collaboration. The full data release is online and available to the public to explore and gain their own insights as well.

DES was designed to map hundreds of millions of galaxies and to discover thousands of supernovae in order to measure the history of cosmic expansion and the growth of large-scale structure in the universe, both of which reflect the nature and amount of dark energy in the universe. DES has produced the largest and most accurate dark matter map from galaxy weak lensing to date, as well as a new map, three times larger, that will be released in the near future. 

One early result relates to the construction of a catalog of a type of pulsating star known as "RR Lyrae," which tells scientists about the region of outer space beyond the edge of our Milky Way. In this area nearly devoid of stars, the motion of the RR Lyrae hint at the presence of an enormous “halo” of invisible dark matter, which may provide clues on how our galaxy was assembled over the last 12 billion years. In another result, DES scientists used the extensive DR2 galaxy catalog, along with data from the LIGO experiment, to estimate the location of a black hole merger and, independent of other techniques, infer the value of the Hubble constant, a key cosmological parameter. Combining their data with other surveys, DES scientists have also been able to generate a complete map of Milky Way’s dwarf satellites, giving researchers insight into how our own galaxy was assembled and how it compares with cosmologists’ predictions.

Covering 5,000 square degrees of the southern sky (one-eighth of the entire sky) and spanning billions of light-years, the survey data enables many other investigations in addition to those targeting dark energy, covering a vast range of cosmic distances — from discovering new nearby solar system objects to investigating the nature of the first star-forming galaxies in the early universe. 

"This is a momentous milestone. For six years, the Dark Energy Survey collaboration took pictures of distant celestial objects in the night sky. Now, after carefully checking the quality and calibration of the images captured by the Dark Energy Camera, we are releasing this second batch of data to the public," said DES Director Rich Kron of Fermilab and the University of Chicago. "We invite professional and amateur scientists alike to dig into what we consider a rich mine of gems waiting to be discovered."

The primary tool in collecting these images, the DOE-built Dark Energy Camera, is mounted to the NSF-funded Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter Telescope, part of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in the Chilean Andes, part of NSF’s NOIRLab. Each week, the survey collected thousands of pictures of the southern sky, unlocking a trove of potential cosmological insights.

Once captured, these images (and the large amount of data surrounding them) are transferred to the National Center for Supercomputing Applications for processing via the DES Data Management project. Using the Blue Waters supercomputer at NCSA, the Illinois Campus Cluster, and compute systems at Fermilab, NCSA prepares calibrated data products for public and research consumption. It takes approximately four months to process one year’s worth of data into a searchable, usable catalog.

The detailed precision cosmology constraints based on the full six-year DES data set will come out over the next two years.

The DES DR2 is hosted at the Community Science and Data Center, a program of the National Science Foundation’s NOIRLab. CSDC provides software systems, user services and development initiatives to connect and support the scientific missions of NOIRLab’s telescopes, including the Blanco Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

NCSA, NOIRLab and the LIneA Science Server collectively provide the tools and interfaces that enable access to DR2.

“Because astronomical data sets today are so vast, the cost to handle them is prohibitive for individual researchers or most organizations. CSDC provides open access to big astronomical data sets like DES DR2 and the necessary tools to explore and exploit them — then all it takes is someone from the community with a clever idea to discover new and exciting science,” said Robert Nikutta, project scientist for Astro Data Lab at CSDC.

"With information on the positions, shapes, sizes, colors and brightnesses of over 690 million stars, galaxies and quasars, the release promises to be a valuable source for astronomers and scientists worldwide to continue their explorations of the universe, including studies of matter (light and dark) surrounding our home Milky Way Galaxy, as well as pushing further to examine groups and clusters of distant galaxies, which hold precise evidence about how the size of the expanding universe changes over time," said Dark Energy Survey Data Management Project Scientist Brian Yanny of Fermilab. 

About DES
This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science.
The Dark Energy Survey is a collaboration of more than 400 scientists from 26 institutions in seven countries. Funding for the DES Projects has been provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Ministry of Science and Education of Spain, the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, the Higher Education Funding Council for England, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago, Funding Authority for Studies and Projects in Brazil, Carlos Chagas Filho Foundation for Research Support of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development and the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, the German Research Foundation and the collaborating institutions in the Dark Energy Survey, the list of which can be found at www.darkenergysurvey.org/collaboration. 

About NSF’s NOIRLab
NSF’s NOIRLab (National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory), the US center for ground-based optical-infrared astronomy, operates the international Gemini Observatory (a facility of NSF, NRC–Canada, ANID–Chile, MCTIC–Brazil, MINCyT–Argentina, and KASI–Republic of Korea), Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), the Community Science and Data Center (CSDC), and Vera C. Rubin Observatory. It is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with NSF and is headquartered in Tucson, Arizona. The astronomical community is honored to have the opportunity to conduct astronomical research on Iolkam Du’ag (Kitt Peak) in Arizona, on Maunakea in Hawaiʻi, and on Cerro Tololo and Cerro Pachón in Chile. We recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that these sites have to the Tohono O’odham Nation, to the Native Hawaiian community, and to the local communities in Chile, respectively.

About NCSA
NCSA at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provides supercomputing and advanced digital resources for the nation’s science enterprise. At NCSA, University of Illinois faculty, staff, students, and collaborators from around the globe use advanced digital resources to address research grand challenges for the benefit of science and society. NCSA has been advancing one third of the Fortune 50® for more than 30 years by bringing industry, researchers, and students together to solve grand challenges at rapid speed and scale. For more information, please visit www.ncsa.illinois.edu.

About Fermilab
Fermilab is America’s premier national laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research. A U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, Fermilab is located near Chicago, Illinois, and operated under contract by the Fermi Research Alliance LLC, a joint partnership between the University of Chicago and the Universities Research Association, Inc. Visit Fermilab’s website at www.fnal.gov and follow us on Twitter at @Fermilab.

The DOE Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

Editor’s note: The DES second data release will be featured at a session of the meeting of the American Astronomical Society. The session, “NOIRLab’s Data Services: A Practical Demo Built on Science with DES DR2”, takes place on Thursday, Jan. 14, 3:10-4:40 p.m. CT.
 
25
Noviembre 2020

Un disco, un planeta y una estrella que forman parte del mismo sistema vistos creciendo simultáneamente


Disk, planet and star of the same system seen growing together
Filaments of accretion falling into the protoplanetary disk
MPE.
  • Un equipo de investigación liderado por el Instituto Max Planck de Física Extraterrestre (MPE) reveló un disco planetario que se está formando antes de que su estrella haya finalizado su formación.
  • El estudio cuenta con la importante aportación de un investigador del Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC).
​Los sistemas estelares, como el nuestro, se forman dentro de nubes interestelares de gas y polvo que colapsan produciendo estrellas jóvenes rodeadas de discos protoplanetarios. Por primera vez, el Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) ha observado un disco protoplanetario con un gran espacio alimentado por la nube circundante a través de grandes filamentos de acreción, sugiriendo que un planeta puede estar formándose en tándem con la estrella madre mientras el disco alrededor de ellos aún está creciendo. 

El equipo de astrónomos liderado por el Dr. Felipe Alves, del Centro de Estudios Astroquímicos (CAS) del Instituto Max Planck de Física Extraterrestre (MPE) y ex-estudiante de doctorado del Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), utilizó ALMA para estudiar el proceso de acreción en el objeto estelar [BHB2007] 1. Este sistema se encuentra en el extremo de la Nube Molecular del Tubo. Los datos de ALMA revelan un disco de polvo y gas alrededor de la protoestrella, y grandes filamentos de gas alrededor de este disco. 

Los científicos, que incluyen al investigador Josep Miquel Girart del IEEC en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC), interpretan estos filamentos como serpentinas de acreción que alimentan el disco con material extraído de la nube ambiente. El disco reprocesa el material acumulado, depositándolo en la protoestrella. 

La estructura observada es muy inusual para los objetos estelares en esta etapa de la evolución —con una edad estimada de un millón de años— cuando los discos circunestelares ya están formados y maduros para la formación de planetas. «Nos sorprendió bastante observar filamentos de acreción tan prominentes cayendo en el disco», dijo el Dr. Alves. «La actividad de los filamentos de acreción demuestra que el disco sigue creciendo mientras alimenta a la protoestrella».

El equipo también informa de la presencia de una enorme cavidad dentro del disco, lo que sugiere que se está formando un joven planeta gigante o una enana marrón. La cavidad tiene un ancho de 70 unidades astronómicas, y abarca una zona compacta de gas molecular caliente. Además, los datos suplementarios en radiofrecuencia del Very Large Array (VLA) apuntan a la existencia de una emisión no térmica en el mismo lugar donde se detectó el gas caliente. Estas dos líneas de evidencia indican que un objeto astronómico está presente dentro de la cavidad. A medida que este compañero estelar, posiblemente un planeta, acumula material del disco, también calienta el gas y posiblemente impulsa fuertes vientos ionizados o chorros. El equipo estima que es necesario un objeto con una masa de entre 4 y 70 masas de Júpiter para producir la cavidad observada en el disco.

Estas observaciones también imponen nuevas restricciones de tiempo para la formación de planetas y la evolución del disco, arrojando luz sobre cómo los sistemas estelares como el nuestro se esculpen a partir de la nube original.

Enlaces
- IEEC
- MPE
- ALMA
- VLA

Más información

Esta investigación se presenta en un artículo titulado «A case of simultaneous star and planet formation», de Felipe O. Alves et al., publicado en la revista The Astrophysical Journal Letters el 19 de noviembre del 2020.

El Instituto de Estudios Espaciales de Catalunya (IEEC) promueve y coordina la investigación y el desarrollo tecnológico espacial en Cataluña en beneficio de la sociedad. El IEEC fomenta las colaboraciones tanto a nivel local como mundial, y es un eficiente agente de transferencia de conocimiento, innovación y tecnología. Como resultado de más de 20 años de investigación de alta calidad, llevada a cabo en colaboración con las principales organizaciones internacionales, el IEEC se encuentra entre los mejores centros de investigación internacionales, centrados en áreas como: astrofísica, cosmología, ciencias planetarias y observación de la Tierra. La división de ingeniería del IEEC desarrolla instrumentación para proyectos terrestres y espaciales, y tiene una amplia experiencia trabajando con organizaciones privadas y públicas del sector aeroespacial y otros sectores de innovación. 

El IEEC es una fundación privada sin ánimo de lucro, regida por un Patronato compuesto por la Generalitat de Catalunya y otras cuatro instituciones con una unidad científica cada una, que en conjunto constituyen el núcleo de la actividad de I+D del IEEC: la Universidad de Barcelona (UB) con la unidad científica ICCUB - Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos; la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB) con la unidad científica CERES - Centro de Estudios e Investigación Espaciales; la Universidad Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC) con la unidad científica CTE - Grupo de Investigación en Ciencias y Tecnologías del Espacio; y el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) con la unidad científica ICE - Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio. El IEEC está integrado en la red CERCA (Centres de Recerca de Catalunya).

Contactos
Oficina de Comunicación del IEEC
Barcelona, España

Ana Montaner y Rosa Rodríguez
Correo electrónico: comunicacio@ieec.cat 

Autor Principal en el IEEC
Barcelona, España

Josep Miquel Girart
Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC)
Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC)
Correo electrónico: girart@ieec.cat 

Nota de prensa elaborada por la Oficina de Comunicación de l'IEEC con la colaboración de Science Wave.
19
Octubre 2020

Un modelo tecnológicamente viable de una ciudad en Marte, tal y como la ha imaginado un equipo catalán


A technologically viable model for a Mars city, as imagined by a Catalan-led team
Nuwa Cliff and Valley Cover
ABIBOO Studio (Sebastián Rodríguez) and SONet
  • Una propuesta de ciudad en el planeta Marte de un equipo liderado por investigadores catalanes fue presentada el pasado sábado, 17 de octubre, en el concurso de la Mars Society.
  • La propuesta está liderada por investigadores del Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC), la Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC), la Escuela Superior de Ingenierías Industrial, Aeroespacial y Audiovisual de Terrassa (ESEIAAT - UPC) y el Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos de la Universidad de Barcelona (ICCUB), junto con el Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM, CSIC).
  • Utilizando los conocimientos científicos disponibles sobre el entorno en Marte, la propuesta aborda todos los aspectos de la vida humana: desde el asentamiento, la arquitectura y los soportes vitales hasta el arte, la economía y el sistema político.
  • El proyecto buscará ahora la industria, los académicos y el sector privado para dar pasos más allá y convertir la ciudad marciana en una opción factible para un futuro asentamiento humano en el planeta rojo.
Bienvenidos a Nüwa, capital de Marte. Los colonos en Marte vivirían aquí y en otras cuatro ciudades verticales integradas en uno de los cientos de acantilados del planeta, que proporcionan protección contra la radiación, pero también exposición a la luz solar. Los edificios en el interior de los acantilados serían mixtos, con capacidad para entre 200.000 y 250.000 personas, e incluirían zonas para vivir y trabajar, así como espacios para alojar exposiciones de arte, jardines exuberantes, plazas públicas, pabellones deportivos subterráneos y salas de música. Comerían una dieta basada al 50% en la agricultura, un 20% de microalgas y un 30% de carne de animales, insectos, setas y carne celular.

El trabajo por persona debería ser ocho veces superior al de un humano medio en la Tierra, pero esto se solucionaría imponiendo la automatización, estandarización y el uso de métodos de Inteligencia Artificial a nivel de diseño. El agua se extraería principalmente de arcillas y el oxígeno sería principalmente producido por los cultivos y las microalgas. Después de la muerte, la biomasa de animales, humanos y plantas se volvería a incorporar al sistema. Marte acabaría convirtiéndose en una democracia, con una Constitución y un cuerpo de ley propios. Cada ciudadano sería accionista de Marte. La sociedad evolucionaría hacia un modelo basado en la comunidad y la sostenibilidad.

Este es el aspecto que tiene una ciudad en Marte y cómo funciona según un equipo internacional de profesionales dirigido por investigadores catalanes. Utilizando conocimientos sobre la geología, la geografía y la atmósfera del planeta rojo, así como complejas investigaciones de la sociología y psicología humanas, el equipo ha imaginado un modelo de vida en Marte, tecnológicamente viable y autosostenible.

Su propuesta fue presentada en el concurso Mars City State Design de la Mars Society, la organización de promoción del espacio más grande e influyente del mundo dedicada a la exploración y el asentamiento humanos en el planeta Marte. El equipo expuso el proyecto el sábado 17 de octubre durante la Mars Society Convention después de haber sido seleccionado entre 10 finalistas de más de 175 propuestas presentadas. Aunque no ganaron el premio, el equipo está convencido de que el enfoque sostenible y centrado en el ser humano en la exploración del espacio es el camino correcto. Así pues, continuarán buscando colaboraciones industriales y académicas para dar vida a algunos de los conceptos básicos del próximo hábitat de la humanidad en Marte.

Esta propuesta de diseño fue creada y promovida por SONet (the Sustainable Off-world Network), una comunidad formada principalmente por profesionales europeos interesados en enfoques multidisciplinarios en la exploración sostenible del espacio. El proyecto está liderado por investigadores del Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC), la Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC), la Escuela Superior de Ingenierías Industrial, Aeroespacial y Audiovisual de Terrassa (ESEIAAT - UPC), y su principal planificación arquitectónica y urbana ha sido dirigida por el estudio ABIBOO. También cuenta con importantes aportaciones de miembros del Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM, CSIC) y el Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos de la Universidad de Barcelona (ICCUB). Participantes de otros países incluyen investigadores y profesionales del Reino Unido, Alemania, Austria, Estados Unidos y Argentina.

“El reto del equipo era diseñar un asentamiento con todo el bienestar de una ciudad moderna que fuera también capaz de obtener todos los recursos a nivel local y obtener rápidamente su independencia financiera y logística de la Tierra”, declara Guillem Anglada-Escudé, investigador Ramón y Cajal del ICE y coordinador del equipo. El proyecto trata todos los aspectos de la vida humana: desde los materiales que se utilizan para construir asentamientos y los mecanismos para garantizar el oxígeno y otros sistemas de apoyo a la vida hasta la economía, el arte, la educación, el sistema político, la guardería, la carga de trabajo, la muerte e incluso la herencia a Marte.

"Desde el punto de vista de un arquitecto del mundo real, diseñar un desarrollo urbano funcional, trabajando con las restricciones de un mundo desconocido para nosotros, fue al mismo tiempo una experiencia alucinante y extremadamente enriquecedora", declaró Alfredo Muñoz, cofundador del estudio ABIBOO y líder del equipo de desarrollo arquitectónico. "Estamos muy ilusionados en seguir evolucionando este primer diseño, y también en identificar nuevas soluciones radicales que funcionarán también en la Tierra".

El proyecto buscará ahora a la industria, los académicos y diferentes socios privados para dar pasos más allá y convertir la ciudad marciana en una opción factible para un futuro establecimiento humano en el planeta rojo. "En un esfuerzo tan grande, la cooperación entre expertos en muchas áreas diferentes es necesaria", explica Miquel Sureda, profesor de ingeniería aeronáutica en la ESEIAAT - UPC. "El éxito del proyecto de Nüwa en el concurso del Mars Society puede ayudar a SONet a ganar visibilidad y atraer miembros y recursos".

"El mundo ha cambiado radicalmente desde que nos pusimos en marzo, y continuará cambiando a ritmos forzados", concluye Anglada-Escudé. "Mientras tanto —añade— los problemas de sostenibilidad de la Tierra no se han ido por la puerta trasera. Aunque no lleguemos a Marte el próximo año ni dentro de veinte, si esto sirve para inspirar a profesionales y jóvenes catalanes y de todo el mundo para trabajar juntos por un planeta más sostenible, ya habremos ganado”.

El siguiente paso inmediato es buscar financiación para realizar una nueva iteración de diseño e iniciar conversaciones para desarrollar un demostrador en la Tierra, que también debería ser utilizado para desarrollar tecnologías de sostenibilidad y como elemento inspirador para promover las ciencias entre jóvenes y no tan jóvenes.

Listado de colaboradores
Project Coordination, Economic model & High-level concepts: Guillem Anglada-Escudé, Ph.D.; RyC fellow in Astrophysics; Institute for Space Science/ CSIC & Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (EU)

Co-coordination. Space, Earth-Mars transportation & Socio-economics: Miquel Sureda, Ph.D.; Space Science and Technology Research Group, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya & Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (EU)

Life Support, Biosystems & Human factors: Gisela Detrell, Ph.D; Institute for Space Systems, Universität Stuttgart (EU)

Design. Architecture & Urbanism: Design Strategy & Coordination: ABIBOO Studio (USA) Preliminary Analysis & Urban Configuration: Alfredo Muñoz (USA); Owen Hughes Pearce (UK)

Detailed Architecture & Urban Design: Alfredo Muñoz (USA); Gonzalo Rojas (Argentina); Engeland Apostol (UK); Sebastián Rodríguez (Argentina); Verónica Florido (UK)

Identity & Graphic Design: Verónica Florido (UK); Engeland Apostol (UK)
Video Direction & CGI: Sebastián Rodríguez (Argentina); Gonzalo Rojas (Argentina)

Mars Materials & Location: Ignasi Casanova, Ph.D.; Prof. Civil and Environmental Engineering; Institute of Energy Technologies (INTE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (EU)

Manufacturing, Advanced Biosystems & Materials: David Cullen; Prof. of Astrobiology and Space Biotechnology; Space Group, University of Cranfield (UK)

Energy & Sustainability: Miquel Banchs i Piqué; School of Civil Engineering & Surveying, University of Portsmouth (UK)

Mining & Excavation systems: Philipp Hartlieb; Prof. in Excavation Engineering, Montan Universitaet Leoben (EU)

Social Services & Life Support Systems: Laia Ribas, Ph.D.; RyC fellow in Biology, Institut de Ciències del Mar/CSIC, (EU)

Mars Climate modeling & Environment: David de la Torre; Dept. of Physics, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (EU)

CONTRIBUTORS:
Jordi Miralda Escudé (ICREA Prof. in Astrophysics - Ground Transport, UB, EU); Rafael Harillo Gomez-Pastrana (Lawyer, - Political Organization & Space law, EU); Lluis Soler (Ph.D. in Chemistry - Chemical processes, UPC, EU); Paula Betriu (Topographical analysis, - UPC, EU); Uygar Atalay (Location, temperature & Radiation analysis, UPC, EU); Pau Cardona (Earth-Mars Transportation, UPC, EU); Oscar Macia (Earth-Mars Transportation, UPC, EU); Eric Fimbinger (Resource Extraction & Conveyance, Montanuniversität Leoben, EU); Stephanie Hensley (Art Strategy in Mars, USA); Carlos Sierra (Electronic Engineering, ICE/CSIC, EU); Elena Montero (Psychologist, EU); Robert Myhill (Mars science – U. Bristol, UK); Rory Beard (Artificial Intelligence, UK)

SUPPORTING INSTITUTIONS:
CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas); ABIBOO Studio; UPC (Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya); Cranfield University; University of Stuttgart; IEEC (Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya); Montan University Leoben; Institut de Ciencies del Mar; University of Portsmouth.

Enlaces
Más información
El Instituto de Estudios Espaciales de Catalunya (IEEC) promueve y coordina la investigación y el desarrollo tecnológico espacial en Cataluña en beneficio de la sociedad. El IEEC fomenta las colaboraciones tanto a nivel local como mundial, y es un eficiente agente de transferencia de conocimiento, innovación y tecnología. Como resultado de más de 20 años de investigación de alta calidad, llevada a cabo en colaboración con las principales organizaciones internacionales, el IEEC se encuentra entre los mejores centros de investigación internacionales, centrados en áreas como: astrofísica, cosmología, ciencias planetarias y observación de la Tierra. La división de ingeniería del IEEC desarrolla instrumentación para proyectos terrestres y espaciales, y tiene una amplia experiencia trabajando con organizaciones privadas y públicas del sector aeroespacial y otros sectores de innovación.

El IEEC es una fundación privada sin ánimo de lucro, regida por un Patronato compuesto por la Generalitat de Catalunya y otras cuatro instituciones con una unidad científica cada una, que en conjunto constituyen el núcleo de la actividad de I+D del IEEC: la Universidad de Barcelona (UB) con la unidad científica ICCUB - Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos; la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB) con la unidad científica CERES - Centro de Estudios e Investigación Espaciales; la Universidad Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC) con la unidad científica CTE - Grupo de Investigación en Ciencias y Tecnologías del Espacio; y el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) con la unidad científica ICE - Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio. El IEEC está integrado en la red CERCA (Centres de Recerca de Catalunya).

Contactos
Oficina de Comunicación del IEEC Barcelona
Ana Montaner Pizá
Correo electrónico: comunicacio@ieec.cat

Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE - CSIC) Barcelona
Guillem Anglada-Escudé
Correo electrónico: anglada@ice.csic.es

Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña (UPC) Barcelona
Miquel Sureda Anfres
Correo electrónico: miquel.sureda@upc.edu
13
Octubre 2020

Investigadores catalanes lideran un proyecto finalista en el concurso de la Mars Society para desarrollar una ciudad en el planeta rojo


Investigadors catalans finalistes al concurs de la Mars Society per desenvolupar una ciutat al planeta vermell
Representació artística d’una cúpula a Mart
ABIBOO studio / SONet (Gonzalo Rojas)
  • La propuesta está liderada por investigadores del Instituto de Estudios Espaciales de Cataluña (IEEC) en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC), la Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña (UPC) y el Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos (ICCUB).
  • El proyecto es uno de los 10 finalistas, seleccionados de entre más de 175 propuestas recibidas.
  • La presentación final tendrá lugar el próximo 17 de octubre y se retransmitirá en directo vía Facebook live en todo el mundo.
¿Qué aspecto tendría una ciudad en Marte? ¿Cómo funcionaría el comercio? ¿Cómo evolucionaría la población urbana? Un equipo internacional liderado por investigadores del  Instituto de Estudios Espaciales de Cataluña (IEEC) imaginó la ciudad en Marte NÜWA, detallada en un extenso proyecto que incluye aspectos científicos, de ingeniería, arquitectónicos, económicos y sociales. El proyecto propone no sólo un diseño urbanístico factible, sino también un plan de desarrollo socioeconómico, así como descripciones a alto nivel de la industria, infraestructura, generación y distribución de energía y servicios necesarios para hacerla realidad.

El proyecto del equipo internacional "The Sustainable Offworld Network" (SONet) ha sido seleccionado como una de las 10 propuestas finalistas del concurso Mars City State Design de la Mars Society, la organización de promoción del espacio más grande y más influyente del mundo dedicada a la exploración y el asentamiento humanos en el planeta Marte. El concurso está centrado en desarrollar una ciudad de un millón de habitantes en Marte de forma sostenible.

La propuesta está liderada por investigadores del IEEC en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC), la Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña (UPC) y el Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos (ICCUB), junto con otros centros del ámbito de investigación nacional, entre los que se encuentra el Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM, CSIC). El equipo consta también de participantes de otros países tales como el Reino Unido, Alemania, Estados Unidos y Argentina. 

Los proyectos finalistas, seleccionados de entre más de 175 propuestas presentadas, se defenderán públicamente el próximo 17 de octubre en la Mars Society Convention. Cinco propuestas serán finalmente premiadas. La defensa será pública y se podrá seguir vía streaming desde todo el mundo.

La propuesta del equipo SONet consta de un informe de 20 páginas con un diseño conceptual que combina aspectos muy diversos que van desde la exploración del espacio hasta la sostenibilidad. La ciudad, llamada NÜWA en honor a la diosa china creadora de la humanidad, simboliza el inicio de una nueva era de nuestra civilización en Marte y la protección que debemos asegurarnos en un mundo tan inhóspito.

"La propuesta es un esfuerzo de combinación de muchas disciplinas de una forma que no se suele hacer en proyectos espaciales", explica Guillem Anglada-Escudé, investigador Ramón y Cajal del ICE y coordinador del equipo. "Además de científicos e ingenieros, quisimos incorporar desde el primer momento expertos en otras disciplinas y de fuera del sector académico". La colaboración incluye, como parte muy importante, el equipo de arquitectura y diseño ABIBOO studio.

El proyecto se concibió durante reuniones on-line en los meses de abril, mayo y junio en pleno confinamiento debido a la actual pandèmia de COVID-19. Ahora, la propuesta ha dado sus frutos. "Llegar a la final ya es un gran éxito para todo el equipo", explica Miquel Sureda, profesor de ingeniería aeronáutica en la Escuela Superior de Ingenierías Industrial, Aeroespacial y Audiovisual de Terrassa (ESEIAAT - UPC). "Esperamos que el concurso nos aporte la visibilidad que necesitamos para recoger apoyo y poder desarrollar conceptos relacionados tanto con el espacio como con sostenibilidad, y la transformación necesaria del sistema productivo que tendremos que afrontar también aquí en la Tierra".

El director del Instituto de Técnicas Energéticas - UPC y co-autor de la iniciativa, Ignasi Casanova, explica: "Realizar estos ejercicios nos hace apreciar la gran dependencia que tenemos de lo que nuestro planeta nos da a cambio de nada. Por ejemplo — añade — la producción de alimentos requiere una enorme cantidad de energía que aquí en la Tierra proviene del Sol, pero que implica el uso de grandes extensiones de superficie útil, y que por lo tanto es una de las actividades humanas más agresivas con el ecosistema terrestre". Temas como el uso y abuso de los plásticos, soluciones constructivas y de materiales que minimicen el uso intensivo de energía y una total reciclabilidad se han estudiado en la propuesta.

"En realidad, la Tierra no es más que un lugar dentro de un vasto Universo. Si aprendemos a crear sociedades con circulación de recursos cerrada, que no dependan críticamente de importaciones remotas desde otro planeta, también deberíamos poder resolver muchos de los problemas que tenemos hoy en la Tierra", concluye Anglada-Escudé.

La presentación se retransmitirá el sábado 17 de octubre a las 22:00 horas (CEST), en directo vía 'Facebook live'. Es necesario registrarse gratuitamente en la web de la Mars Society.

Enlaces
- IEEC
- ICE - CSIC
- UPC
- ICC - UB
- The Sustainable Offworld Network (SONet) 
- Mars Society

Más información
El Instituto de Estudios Espaciales de Catalunya (IEEC) promueve y coordina la investigación y el desarrollo tecnológico espacial en Cataluña en beneficio de la sociedad. El IEEC fomenta las colaboraciones tanto a nivel local como mundial, y es un eficiente agente de transferencia de conocimiento, innovación y tecnología. Como resultado de más de 20 años de investigación de alta calidad, llevada a cabo en colaboración con las principales organizaciones internacionales, el IEEC se encuentra entre los mejores centros de investigación internacionales, centrados en áreas como: astrofísica, cosmología, ciencias planetarias y observación de la Tierra. La división de ingeniería del IEEC desarrolla instrumentación para proyectos terrestres y espaciales, y tiene una amplia experiencia trabajando con organizaciones privadas y públicas del sector aeroespacial y otros sectores de innovación.  

El IEEC es una fundación privada sin ánimo de lucro, regida por un Patronato compuesto por la Generalitat de Catalunya y otras cuatro instituciones con una unidad científica cada una, que en conjunto constituyen el núcleo de la actividad de I+D del IEEC: la Universidad de Barcelona (UB) con la unidad científica ICCUB - Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos; la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB) con la unidad científica CERES - Centro de Estudios e Investigación Espaciales; la Universidad Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC) con la unidad científica CTE - Grupo de Investigación en Ciencias y Tecnologías del Espacio; y el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) con la unidad científica ICE - Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio. El IEEC está integrado en la red CERCA (Centres de Recerca de Catalunya).

Contactos
Oficina de Comunicación del IEEC
Barcelona
Ana Montaner Pizá
Correo electrónico: comunicacio@ieec.cat 

Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE - CSIC)
Barcelona
Guillem Anglada-Escudé
Correo electrónico: anglada@ice.csic.es

Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña (UPC)
Barcelona
Miquel Sureda Anfres
Correo electrónico: miquel.sureda@upc.edu
07
Octubre 2020

Primer premio compartido para el corto científico del investigador Enrique Gaztañaga en Ciencia en Acción 2020


Enrique Gaztañaga galardonado con el primer premio compartido en la final del programa Ciencia en Acción 2020
Enrique Gaztanaga
ICE
El investigador del Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE-CSIC) Enrique Gaztañaga ha sido galardonado con el primer premio ex-aequo en la final del concurso Ciencia en Acción 2020, en la modalidad Cortos Científicos, con el trabajo titulado “2019 EL COSMOS EN ACELERACIÓN Parte I Cap. III”. Este premio ha sido compartido con Álex Muntada y Jaume Benet, ambos de la Facultat de Comunicació Blanquerna de la Universitat Ramon Llull de Barcelona. Los distintos premios se dieron a conocer en un acto virtual que, a priori, se debía celebrar en Murcia los días 2-4 de octubre. 

Santiago Serrano, también investigador IEEC en el ICE-CSIC, ha participado en la elaboración de material audiovisual, con vídeos que muestran imágenes de las simulaciones cosmológicas MICE (Marenostrum Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio) realizadas por miembros del grupo de Cosmología del ICE-CSIC: Francisco Castander, Pablo Fosalba y Martin Crocce.

“2019 EL COSMOS EN ACELERACIÓN Parte I Cap. III” es un documental divulgativo que cuenta el esfuerzo de la comunidad científica por dilucidar cuál es la causa de la expansión acelerada del Universo. El corto científico relata cómo la mayor cámara digital del mundo ha sido instalada en un telescopio gigante para llevar a cabo el mayor mapa del cosmos hasta la fecha. Es la historia de Enrique Gaztañaga y de su trabajo en la confección de mapas de galaxias como los de la iniciativa española PAU (Physics of the Accelerating Universe) y DES (Dark Energy Survey), ambos proyectos de cartografía galáctica en los que Gaztañaga participa de forma decisiva. 

Pero, ¿por qué son tan necesarios estos mapas cósmicos? La respuesta viene de un descubrimiento hecho público en 1998 y premiado con el Nobel de Física en 2011: el Universo se expande de forma acelerada. Esta idea poco conocida por el gran público desafía nuestra comprensión de las leyes fundamentales de la naturaleza y constituye uno de los mayores misterios sin resolver del cosmos. Parece existir una enigmática materia oscura que mantiene unidas las estrellas y las galaxias. Y una todavía más extraña fuerza, denominada energía oscura, que está acelerando la expansión del Universo. Combinadas, ambas componen el 95% de su materia-energía. Sin embargo su naturaleza es aún desconocida. Hasta donde sabemos hoy en día la única forma de resolver el misterio de la expansión acelerada del Universo es cartografiándolo, es decir, creando grandes mapas de galaxias como PAU y DES. 

Ciencia en Acción es un concurso internacional dirigido a estudiantes, profesores, investigadores y divulgadores de la comunidad científica, en cualquiera de sus disciplinas. Su principal objetivo es presentar la ciencia de una manera atractiva y motivadora. El programa está dirigido por Rosa María Ferré, licenciada en Matemáticas y Doctora en Ciencias Físicas por la Universidad de Barcelona, que desde su creación ha asumido su desarrollo a lo largo de las 20 ediciones del concurso. En Ciencia en Acción participan el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), la Fundación Lilly, la Fundació Princesa de Girona (FPdGi), el Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas (ICMAT), la Real Sociedad Española de Física (RSEF), la Real Sociedad Española de Química (RSEQ), la Sociedad Española de Astronomía (SEA), la Sociedad Geológica de España (SGE) y la Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED).

Podéis disfrutar del corto aquí y de una versión más larga aquí.
 
10
Septiembre 2020

Presentada la propuesta para incluir el Einstein Telescope en la hoja de ruta ESFRI


Proposal submitted to include the Einstein Telescope in the ESFRI roadmap
Proposal to include the Einstein Telescope in ESFRI roadmap
NASA / Imagno / Getty Images
Presentada la propuesta para incluir el Einstein Telescope en la hoja de ruta ESFRI
  • El Einstein telescope es un ambicioso proyecto de observatorio terrestre de ondas gravitacionales de tercera generación.
  • 40 instituciones europeas firman la propuesta, 8 de ellas españolas.
  • La propuesta recoge el interés de hasta 23 instituciones españolas.
Madrid / Barcelona, 10 de Septiembre de 2020
 
El consorcio del Einstein Telescope ha presentado la propuesta para incluir el proyecto para un futuro observatorio de ondas gravitacionales en la actualización de 2021 de la hoja de ruta del Foro Estratégico Europeo para Infraestructuras de Investigación (ESFRI), el programa que describe las principales infraestructuras de investigación futuras en Europa.
 
El Einstein Telescope (ET) es el proyecto más ambicioso para un futuro observatorio terrestre de ondas gravitacionales.  Su diseño conceptual ha sido apoyado por una subvención de la Comisión Europea. Ahora un consorcio de países europeos y de instituciones de investigación y universidades en Europa ha presentado oficialmente la propuesta para la realización de dicha infraestructura con el apoyo político de cinco países europeos: Bélgica, Polonia, España y Holanda, liderados por Italia. El consorcio ET reúne a unas 40 instituciones de investigación y universidades de varios países europeos, incluidos también Francia, Alemania, Hungría, Noruega, Suiza y Reino Unido. El Observatorio Gravitacional Europeo (EGO) en Italia constituye su sede de transición.
 
El Einstein Telescope ha despertado un gran interés en la comunidad científica española implicada en ondas gravitacionales, que incluye a todos los centros que actualmente participan en programas terrestres (LIGO / Virgo / KAGRA) y espaciales (LISA), así como una fuerte comunidad. Investigadores españoles han contribuido de forma significativa al desarrollo del programa de física de ET, así como a la preparación del informe de diseño técnico de ET.
 
Además, motivados por el desarrollo de nuevas tecnologías y los potenciales retornos significativos para la industria española, también se brindó un apoyo explícito por parte de instituciones de investigación, incluidas algunas “Infraestructuras Científicas y Técnicas Singulares” (ICTS). En total, hasta 23 instituciones españolas apoyaron  la iniciativa ESFRI, lo que resultó en el apoyo político formal de España a la candidatura del ET.
 
Actualmente se están evaluando dos sitios para la realización de la infraestructura ET: Euregio Meuse-Rhine, en las fronteras de Bélgica, Alemania y los Países Bajos, y en Cerdeña, Italia. Estos sitios están siendo estudiados y se tomará una decisión sobre la ubicación futura de ET dentro de los próximos 5 años.
 
Einstein Telescope: Un observatorio para la astronomía multi-mensajero
 
Los asombrosos logros científicos de Advanced Virgo (en Europa) y Advanced LIGO (en los EE. UU.) en los últimos 5 años iniciaron la era de la astronomía de ondas gravitacionales. La aventura comenzó con la primera detección directa de ondas gravitacionales en septiembre de 2015 y continuó en agosto de 2017 cuando Advanced Virgo y Advanced LIGO observaron ondas gravitacionales emitidas por dos estrellas de neutrones en fusión. Simultáneamente, las señales de este evento se observaron con una variedad de telescopios electromagnéticos (en la tierra y en el espacio) en todo el rango de longitud de onda observable, desde ondas de radio hasta rayos gamma. Esto marcó el comienzo de la era de la astronomía multi-mensajero con ondas gravitacionales.
 
La reciente observación de Advanced Virgo y Advanced LIGO de la fusión de dos agujeros negros estelares para crear un agujero negro 142 veces más masivo que el Sol (el llamado Agujero Negro de Masa Intermedia) demostró la existencia de tales objetos previamente desconocidos en nuestro Universo.
 
Para aprovechar al máximo el potencial de esta nueva disciplina, se necesita una nueva generación de observatorios. El  Einstein Telescope permitirá a los científicos detectar cualquier coalescencia de dos agujeros negros de masa intermedia en todo el universo y contribuir así a la comprensión de su formación y evolución. Esto arrojará nueva luz sobre el Universo Oscuro y aclarará los roles de la energía oscura y la materia oscura en la estructura del cosmos. ET explorará la física de los agujeros negros en detalle. Estos son cuerpos celestes extremos que predice la teoría de la relatividad general de Albert Einstein, pero también son lugares donde esa teoría puede fallar debido al campo gravitacional extremadamente fuerte. ET detectará miles de coalescencias de estrellas de neutrones por año mejorando nuestra comprensión del comportamiento de la materia en condiciones tan extremas de densidad y presión que no se pueden producir en ningún laboratorio. Además, tendremos la oportunidad de explorar la física nuclear que controla las explosiones de supernovas de las estrellas.
 
Estos desafíos científicos necesitan un nuevo observatorio capaz de observar Ondas Gravitacionales con una sensibilidad de al menos un orden de magnitud mejor que los detectores actuales (la denominada segunda generación).
 
El Einstein Telescope se ubicará en una nueva infraestructura y aplicará tecnologías que mejorarán drásticamente las actuales. Se espera que le siga un proyecto complementario en los EE. UU., Cosmic Explorer.
 
Contactos:
Mario Martínez (IFAE, miembro del Comité Directivo del Einstein Telescope) (mmp@ifae.es)
 
Información Adicional
Relación de las Instituciones españolas firmantes de la propuesta ET ESFRI
  • Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC)
  • Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (ICE-CSIC)
  • Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB)
  • Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM)
  • Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE)
  • Instituto de Física Teórica (IFT-CSIC)
  • Universitat de les Illes Balears (UIB)
  • Universitat de València (UV)
 
Relación de instituciones españolas que apoyaron originalmente la candidatura ET ESFRI
 
  • ALBA Synchrotron*
  • Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC)*
  • Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc (LSC)*
  • Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT)
  • Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC)
  • Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (ICE-CSIC)
  • Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB)
  • Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM)
  • Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE)
  • Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC-CSIC)
  • Instituto de Física Teórica (IFT-CSIC)
  • Port d’informació Científica (PIC)
  • RedIris*
  • Universidad de Alicante (UA)
  • Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM)
  • Universitat de les Illes Balears (UIB)
  • Universidad de Cádiz (UC)
  • Universidad de Murcia (UMU)
  • Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU)
  • ]Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM)
  • Universidad de Salamanca (USAL)
  • Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (USC)
  • Universitat de València (UV)
  • * ICTS  
    También apoyado por: Sociedad Española de Relatividad y Gravitación (SEGRE)
    01
    Septiembre 2020

    A Nebula's Gamma-ray Heartbeat is NASA high-energy picture of the week


    NASA High Energy Astrophysics Archive features our recent SS433 research with its Picture of the Week
    NASA High Energy Astrophysics Archive has selected an image related to a recent Nature Astronomy paper for its Picture of the Week: https://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/objects/heapow/archive/nebulae/SS433_fermi.html

    Using Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and the giant Arecibo radio telescope our study revealed a high-energy "heartbeat", coming from a cosmic gas cloud located about 100 light years away from SS 433. The surprising gamma-ray signal from this otherwise cold, innocuous cloud pulses with the rhythm of the precessing jet from the black hole in SS 433. This shows that shomehow there must be a direct connection between the precessing jet from SS 433 and the gamma-ray pulsations at the cloud.

    Reference:
    Gamma-ray heartbeat powered by the microquasar SS 433;  Jian Li, Diego Torres , Ruo-Yu Liu, Matthew Kerr, Emma de Oña Wilhelmi, Yang Su; Nature Astronomy, 2020; DOI: 10.1038/s41550-020-1164-6
    17
    Agosto 2020

    Extraña coincidencia cósmica: un pulso de rayos gamma desconcierta a los científicos


    Atomic gas clouds blinks in sync with circling black hole
    Artistic view of SS 433 and Fermi J1913+0515
    Produced by Konrad Rappaport, Susane Landis (Scicomlab for DESY), under advice by Jian Li (DESY), Diego F. Torres (ICREA / ICE, CSIC / IEEC)
    Extraña coincidencia cósmica: un pulso de rayos gamma desconcierta a los científicos
    • Un grupo de astrónomos ha detectado una nube de gas cósmica que late al mismo ritmo que un agujero negro separado 100 años luz, en un microcuásar.
    • El microcuásar se encuentra en la Vía Láctea y consiste en una estrella gigante y un agujero negro. La nube se encuentra en la constelación del Águila.
    • Los modelos teóricos publicados hasta la fecha no predecían este resultado, que desafía a las interpretaciones más comunes.
    • El estudio está liderado por un científico del laboratorio DESY en Hamburgo y un investigador del Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC). Estos resultados han sido publicados en la revista Nature Astronomy.
    Un equipo de científicos ha detectado un misterioso pulso de rayos gamma proveniente de una nube de gas cósmico. La nube, sin ninguna característica extraordinaria y que se encuentra en la constelación del Águila, late al mismo ritmo que un agujero negro cercano, lo que indica una conexión entre ambos objetos. El estudio, liderado por el investigador Jian Li del laboratorio DESY en Hamburgo y el profesor ICREA Diego F. Torres del Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) en el Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE, CSIC), se publica hoy en la revista Nature Astronomy.

    Los investigadores han analizado más de diez años de observaciones del Telescopio Espacial de Rayos Gamma Fermi de la NASA, observando lo que se denomina un  microcuásar. Los microcuásares, hermanos pequeños y locales de los lejanos cuásares, son sistemas binarios que comprenden un objeto compacto y una estrella acompañante. Estos microcuásares lanzan en el entorno interestelar que los rodea potentes vientos y chorros (jets) de la materia proveniente de una estrella vecina. El sistema observado en este estudio ha sido catalogado como SS 433 y se encuentra a unos 15.000 años luz de distancia en la Vía Láctea. Consiste en una estrella gigante con unas 30 veces la masa de nuestro Sol (masa solar) y un agujero negro con aproximadamente 10 a 20 masas solares. Los dos objetos están orbitando entre sí mientras el agujero negro absorbe materia de la estrella gigante. El SS 433 es uno de los sistemas binarios compactos más famosos que se conocen, debido a los chorros observables que se balancean, y aunque se ha estudiado durante décadas todavía sorprende a los investigadores.
    "Este material se acumula en un disco alrededor del agujero negro antes de caer en él como el agua en el remolino del desagüe de una bañera", explica Li, investigador de DESY. "Sin embargo, una parte de esa materia no cae por el desagüe, sino que sale disparada a alta velocidad en dos estrechos chorros en direcciones opuestas por encima y por debajo del disco que gira". 
    “El disco de acreción no se encuentra exactamente en el plano de la órbita de los dos objetos — añade Li — sino que se balancea como una peonza que se ha colocado inclinada sobre una mesa. Como consecuencia, los dos chorros entran en espiral en el espacio circundante, en lugar de simplemente formar una línea recta".

    El balanceo de los chorros del agujero negro realiza un movimiento periódico que dura 162 días, aproximadamente. Las partículas de alta velocidad y los campos magnéticos ultra fuertes del chorro producen rayos X y rayos gamma, habiendo sido estos últimos observados por el equipo. Un análisis meticuloso reveló una señal de rayos gamma con el mismo período proveniente de una nube de gas ordinaria ubicada relativamente lejos de los chorros del microcuásar. Los ritmos de pulsación de esta nube de gas indican que la emisión de la señal de rayos gamma está gobernada por el microcuásar.

    “La señal temporal observada proporciona una conexión inequívoca entre el microcuásar y la nube de gas, separados unos 100 años luz. Este hecho es tan sorprendente como intrigante, y abre preguntas sobre cómo el agujero negro alimenta los latidos de la nube”, dice Torres, investigador del IEEC en el ICE-CSIC. Una explicación que el equipo ha explorado se basa en el impacto de protones rápidos producidos en los extremos de los chorros, o cerca del agujero negro, que son inyectados en la nube y golpean las partículas de gas, produciendo rayos gamma. Los protones también podrían provenir de una eyección de partículas rápidas desde el borde del disco de acreción. Cada vez que este flujo de partículas golpea la nube de gas, éste se ilumina al producir rayos gamma, explicando su extraño pulso. “El flujo de materia desde el disco podría ser energéticamente tan poderoso como el de los chorros del microcuásar y se cree que se balancea conjuntamente con el resto del sistema", explica Torres.

    Más allá de este descubrimiento inicial, se requieren tanto observaciones adicionales como un estudio teórico para explicar los pulsos de rayos gamma de este sistema único. "El SS 433 continúa sorprendiendo por igual a los observadores en todas las frecuencias y a los teóricos", enfatiza Li. "Y es seguro que proporcionará un banco de pruebas para nuestro conocimiento sobre la producción y propagación de rayos cósmicos cerca de los microcuásares en los próximos años".

    El equipo de investigación liderado por Torres y Li está compuesto por científicos internacionales de España (IEEC-ICE-CSIC), Alemania (DESY), China (Universidad de Nanjing y Observatorio Purple Mountain) y EEUU (NRL).

    Instrumentos
    El Telescopio Espacial de Rayos Gamma Fermi se lanzó desde el Centro Espacial Kennedy el 11 de junio de 2008. Fermi tiene dos instrumentos de rayos gamma: el Telescopio de Área Grande (LAT, por sus siglas en inglés) y el Monitor de Explosión de Rayos Gamma (GBM, por sus siglas en inglés). El LAT es un telescopio de rayos gamma de campo amplio. Desde el comienzo de las observaciones regulares, LAT escanea el cielo brindando cobertura de toda su totalidad cada dos órbitas. El GBM es un monitor de todo el cielo que detecta eventos transitorios como ocultaciones y explosiones de rayos gamma.
    Diego F. Torres y Jian Li son miembros de Fermi-LAT.

    Enlaces
    - IEEC
    - ICE
    - DESY

    Más información
    Esta investigación se presenta en un artículo titulado “Gamma-ray heartbeat powered by the microquasar SS 433”, de Jian Li, D. F. Torres, Ruo-Yu Liu, Matthew Kerr, Emma de Oña Wilhelmi y Yang Su, que ha sido publicado en la revista Nature Astronomy, 2020, el 17 de Agosto de 2020.

    El Instituto de Estudios Espaciales de Catalunya (IEEC) promueve y coordina la investigación y el desarrollo tecnológico espacial en Cataluña en beneficio de la sociedad. El IEEC fomenta las colaboraciones tanto a nivel local como mundial, y es un eficiente agente de transferencia de conocimiento, innovación y tecnología. Como resultado de más de 20 años de investigación de alta calidad, llevada a cabo en colaboración con las principales organizaciones internacionales, el IEEC se encuentra entre los mejores centros de investigación internacionales, centrados en áreas como: astrofísica, cosmología, ciencias planetarias y observación de la Tierra. La división de ingeniería del IEEC desarrolla instrumentación para proyectos terrestres y espaciales, y tiene una amplia experiencia trabajando con organizaciones privadas y públicas del sector aeroespacial y otros sectores de innovación.  

    El IEEC es una fundación privada sin ánimo de lucro, regida por un Patronato compuesto por la Generalitat de Catalunya y otras cuatro instituciones con una unidad científica cada una, que en conjunto constituyen el núcleo de la actividad de I+D del IEEC: la Universidad de Barcelona (UB) con la unidad científica ICCUB - Instituto de Ciencias del Cosmos; la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB) con la unidad científica CERES - Centro de Estudios e Investigación Espaciales; la Universidad Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC) con la unidad científica CTE - Grupo de Investigación en Ciencias y Tecnologías del Espacio; y el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) con la unidad científica ICE - Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio. El IEEC está integrado en la red CERCA (Centres de Recerca de Catalunya).

    Contactos
    Oficina de Comunicación del IEEC
    Barcelona, España
    Ana Montaner Pizá
    Correo electrónico: comunicacio@ieec.cat 

    Instituto de Ciencias Espaciales (ICE, CSIC)
    Barcelona, España
    Diego F. Torres
    Correo electrónico: dtorres@ice.csic.es

    Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY
    Hamburgo, Alemania
    Jian Li
    Correo electrónico: jian.li@desy.de

    Nota de prensa elaborada por la Oficina de Comunicación de l'IEEC con la colaboración de Science Wave.
     
    17
    Agosto 2020

    Campos magnéticos con los flujos de gas


    Comments of Gemma Busquet in Nature Astronomy News & Views about a paper of Pillai et al (2020)
    Campos magnéticos con los flujos de gas
    Los campos magnéticos en las nubes moleculares juegan un papel crucial en la regulación de los flujos de gas y la formación de estrellas. Las observaciones polarimétricas del infrarrojo lejano obtenidas con el Observatorio Estratosférico de Astronomía Infrarroja (SOFIA) revelan la estructura del campo magnético a pequeña escala dentro de los filamentos de gas denso, descubriendo una nueva transición en la orientación relativa entre el campo magnético y la estructura de la nube. Gemma Busquet, investigadora del Instituto de Ciencias Espaciales (ICE-CSIC) comenta estos resultados científicos, publicados en la revista Nature Astronomy por Pillai et al. (2020), dentro de la sección News & Views [1]. El trabajo de Pillai et al. [2] proporciona evidencias observacionales de que la gravedad arrastra el campo magnético congelado a gran escala, haciendo que se vuelva paralelo al flujo de gas que nutre el cúmulo de estrellas en formación. Tales flujos de gas inducidos por la gravedad en los filamentos respaldan un escenario en el que el colapso gravitacional y la formación de cúmulos estelares ocurren incluso en presencia de campos magnéticos relativamente fuertes.

    Referencias:
    [1] Busquet, G., Nature Astronomy News & Views. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-020-1180-6 (2020)
    [2] Pillai, T., et al. Nature Astronomy. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-020-1172-6 (2020)
    Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC)

    Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans, s/n
    08193 Barcelona.
    Phone: +34 93 737 9788
    Email: ice@ice.csic.es
    Website developed with RhinOS

    Síguenos


    An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

    An institute of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas
    Affiliated with the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya

    Affiliated with the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya